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Children’s Books We’re Currently Reading

Parenting, Reading

Written by Stuart

April 4, 2020

When I lived in the United States, I was fortunate enough to be right around the corner from a used books store called Half Price Books. My favorite thing about Half Price was they always had a very robust clearance section of kid’s books. The selection was ever-changing, so whenever I would pop in, the potential for snagging a few new children’s board books or easy readers was high. I always tried to grab a nice variety (gender, race, culture, etc.) of kid’s books when I popped in. There was always something, but it was a regular challenge to track down stories that didn’t fall into the traditional stereotype realms. Below are a handful of children’s books that regularly make it into the morning or bedtime routine that everyone in the household enjoys.

Paperback
Published by Puffin Books

Pet Show! is an excellent introduction to the beautiful world of Ezra Jack Keats. Keats’ work is usually set in one of the boroughs of New York, which immediately lends itself to a diverse character set. The kids represented in the story are a reflection of a multi-cultural neighborhood. Still, none of his stories are themed around this topic.

The main character is a young boy named Archie (this is a recurring character) who wants to enter his pet cat into the neighborhood pet show. When the cat goes missing, some creative problem-solving saves the day.

My son loves the book because there is a right mix of pets in the story, and it is mostly child-driven. Archie and his friends are the main characters, while the adults are really there to just support.

Paperback + Board book
Published by Annick Press

Pet Show! is an excellent introduction to the beautiful world of Ezra Jack Keats. Keats’ work is usually set in one of the boroughs of New York, which immediately lends itself to a diverse character set. The kids represented in the story are a reflection of a multi-cultural neighborhood. Still, none of his stories are themed around this topic.

The main character is a young boy named Archie (this is a recurring character) who wants to enter his pet cat into the neighborhood pet show. When the cat goes missing, some creative problem-solving saves the day.

My son loves the book because there is a right mix of pets in the story, and it is mostly child-driven. Archie and his friends are the main characters, while the adults are really there to just support.

Board book
Published by LB Kids

Besos for Baby is a beautifully illustrated Spanish/English board book that has a lot going for it. It is effortless to read and fun to look at. The simple Spanish words are easy for young readers to pick up, and the colorful pictures pair nicely with the rhythm of the story.

One of my favorite parts is the final spread that does a nice recap of the words used in the story, along with a visual connection to help drive home the ideas. The illustrations in the book are bright and bold, making me wish I could track down printable versions for my son’s room.

Paperback + Board book
Published by Firefly Books

This is one of our go-to bedtime books. Love You Forever follows a mother and young boy as he grows into an adult man, and she and an older woman. At the end of each developmental milestone, the mother sings a beautiful and soothing song to her son. The soothing ton of the song helps set the bedtime mood while it’s being read. Love You Forever is also a really lovely visual and auditory queue for my son that it’s time to slow down and shift into resting mode.

Paperback + Hardcover
Published by HarperCollins

Where the Wild Things Are was one of my favorite stories as a child. There is so much packed into Sendak’s work, and this one doesn’t disappoint. The classic tale of a little mischief, a little kid-centric make-believe, and some Wild Things that are just scary enough the keep kids on their toes.

One of the things I love about the story is how the images grow and shrink throughout the book. This visual is like a fun hidden gem that really isn’t there until you notice it.

Milo and I have great discussions about the illustrations in the book, and some of the grownup deemed misbehavior that happens throughout the story.

Another thing that strikes a chord in the story is that it wraps up with supper waiting for the boy. No matter how frustrated and exhausted we get as parents, there is always that no ending love that comes back to tie things up.

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